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Freezing Fiddleheads for your winter delight

Today is May 19, 2011, and TODAY is the perfect day to freeze fiddleheads for the winter.  The season will last for about 14 days, so your small window of opportunity to get some of these green goodies in your freezer is slowly closing.

1. Wash your fiddle heads very well in cold water

2. Get a big pot of water on a rolling boil

3. Put up to 3 pounds of fiddle heads into the water.

4. Bring the water back up to a rolling boil.  Boil for 2 minutes.

5. Drain the whole lot into a sink, run cold water over the fiddle heads to stop the cooking process.

6. Let the fiddle heads dry, then bag in sizes appropriate for your family and freeze.

Fiddleheads will keep in your freezer until the next season.