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Freezing Asparagus for the Winter!

May 09, 2019
You can pickle or can asparagus for the winter, but I am much much too lazy for such things.  I'll freeze asparagus as it takes next to no effort. It's...

Sue's Fiddlehead or Asparagus Pasta

May 09, 2019
You have to love our customers.  They love food and cooking as much as I do, and they SHARE their recipes!! Here is Sue's fiddlehead pasta Sue’s Fiddlehead Pasta 2...

Asparagus Chevre Toast...an easy party pleaser

May 09, 2019
Grill your local asparagus as per my "Asparagus on the BBQ" recipe. Take one sliced ciabatta loaf from our bakery. Brush one side of the ciabatta with grape seed oil. ...

Asparagus on the BBQ

May 09, 2019
The only way I will eat asparagus is on the BBQ.  We make this dish at least 3 times a week during asparagus season. Heat your grill to high, then...

Erin's pasta sauce with frozen tomatoes.

May 09, 2019
This is how I make up my pasta in the winter.  Its fresh taste brings a blast of summer memories back. An hour or two before supper get 6 tomatoes...

Summer Foodbox June 26/27

Food for Thought... Using Spring Greens

  Some weeks including this first week you will be getting lotssss of greens to use, which comes with the question of what to do with them all!? While it might be easy for some, maybe not so much for others which is why I will give you some tips. Wash and chop up all the greens right when they're fresh. Store them in a ziplock bag wrapped in paper towel and I think this is the best way to keep them fresh and easily accessible. All of your dark leafy greens can be put into smoothies or blended and frozen in ice cube trays. I like doing this when they start to wilt and then I can use them later on. You can also use a combination for a pesto, in a stir fry, omelette/scrambled eggs or in a soup! Using the greens on your radishes, turnips and beets will ensure there's no waste and you're getting all the nutrients out of that vegetable. The leaves can also be used for lettuce wraps or in sandwiches! Get creative and you will be able to use them all within the week.

Full Produce: to receive a minimum of 9 of the following 11 items

Rhubarb - The rhubarb is grown by Nico at Twin River Gardens. Best stored with the root ends in water but for fridge space sake you might want to chop it up and put it in a bag in the fridge or freezer. There's all kinds of recipes out there for rhubarb muffins or cake, an example being this one by Genius Kitchen. I recently made stewed rhubarb which is super easy and flavourful. You simply cook down the 1 inch pieces of rhubarb in a sauce pan with a bit of water, sugar and vanilla. Store in a container in the fridge. Turnip Bunch - These are from Teulon, MB at Jonathan's Farm. These are summer turnips.  Unlike the fall ones, you can eat these crunchy babies raw.  They are similar to a radish and both the roots and leaves are edible.  Store them in the crisper. You can cut off the leaves and place in a big bag with all your other greens from the box. Turnips have a slightly milder taste than radishes but the same crunch and earthiness. Peeling not necessary, just cut into wedges and serve raw with a dip or shave into a salad. For a hot side dish, you can roast or sauté them alone or with other veggies. These Roasted Turnips are easy and bring out the sweetness of them!   Red Radishes - The radish bunches are from Wenkai Oriental Vegetables in Elie. Store in the crisper with the turnips and save the greens to be eaten so there's no waste! The greens have a nice peppery taste similar to arugula. The radishes have a strong slightly spicy bite so I prefer to slice or shave thinly and add to salads and sandwiches. You could also add these thin slices into a taco, burger or avocado toast. Quarter and roast with the turnips if you prefer them soft and slightly sweet.   Spinach - Spinach bunches are from Peter at St. Francis Xavier. Rinse the bunch, then pat dry and store in a large ziplock in the fridge. Great for smoothies, salads with fruit, or a turkey spinach burger for the grill! Or try Erin Crampton's favourite Spinach Goma Ae recipe.  Spinach is super high in iron, folate and vitamin K, one of the most nutrient dense greens.   Swiss Chard - Chard is from Justin at Hearts & Roots. Store in the crisper with the other greens. The stems can be used along with the greens. Sauté for a couple minutes and the chard can go into a pasta or egg dish, mix into potatoes or add to the spinach burgers. It can also be used as a salad green which is what I would do because I'm not a fan of the wilted greens.  This Mediterranean Chard Salad has sliced radish, tomato and peppers and would be great as a work lunch.   Green Onion - Comes from Wenkai Oriental Vegetables. Roughly chop and store in a container in the fridge or the bottoms in a glass with water. These spring green onions give a delicious fresh crunch to a greens salad or stir fry. Doesn't take a lot of effort, just finely chop up and sprinkle in your lunch and dinner items. I also like it sliced finely and put into a veggie dip or tuna salad.  Did you know that you can plant the root ends of green onions.  Chop and use the onion, plant the roots in your garden and they'll keep growing!   Bunch Beets - Red beets are from Sommerfeld, MB. Remove the beet leaves and store in a greens bag in the fridge. The beets should also go into a bag or container in the fridge as it helps prevent them from going soft. Roast the beets for a sweet earthiness or shred them and make your own Colourful Beet Salad with spinach. If left too long you can also juice them or add to a smoothie.   Tomatoes - These are grown at Greenland Gardens. This is a greenhouse so you will notice how the tomatoes look absolutely perfect. Store on the counter or fridge, and slice for burgers, sandwiches, salads, etc. I like to dice them and make a quick salsa or bruschetta.   Potatoes - These potatoes are from Dennis at Oak Valley Vegetables. They are large red or yellow storage potatoes from last Fall's harvest. The new crop won't be ready for a little while yet.  Store them in the bag in a cool pantry or basement. Very easy to prepare, you can cut into wedges and grill on the BBQ or chop up boil and then mix in with some greens. This recipe for Roasted Root Vegetables can be done with your potatoes, radish, turnips and beets all together.   Romaine - Lettuce comes from Peter at St. Francis Xavier. Store in the fridge crisper. Chop up and place in a bag for easy access when making your sandwiches, wraps, salads, etc. I haven't tried Grilled Romaine but I've only heard good things about it!   Herbs - Either cilantro, basil or rosemary are delivered by Joanne. Great fresh add in to chicken or meat marinades, pasta salads or potatoes.  

Half Produce: to receive a minimum of 6 of the following 8 items

Rhubarb - The rhubarb is grown by Nico at Twin River Gardens. Best stored with the root ends in water but for fridge space sake you might want to chop it up and put it in a bag in the fridge or freezer. There's all kinds of recipes out there for rhubarb muffins or cake, an example being this one by Genius Kitchen. I recently made stewed rhubarb which is super easy and flavourful. You simply cook down the 1 inch pieces of rhubarb in a sauce pan with a bit of water, sugar and vanilla. Store in a container in the fridge. Red Radishes - The radish bunches are from Wenkai Oriental Vegetables in Elie. Store in the crisper with the turnips and save the greens to be eaten so theres no waste! The greens have a nice peppery taste similar to arugula. The radishes have a strong slightly spicy bite so I prefer to slice or shave thinly and add to salads and sandwiches. You could also add these thin slices into a taco, burger or avocado toast. Quarter and roast with the turnips if you prefer them soft. Spinach - Spinach bunches are from Peter at St. Francis Xavier. Rinse the bunch, then pat dry and store in a large ziplock in the fridge. Great for smoothies, salads with fruit, or a turkey spinach burger for the grill! Or try Erin Crampton's favourite Spinach Goma Ae recipe.  Spinach is super high in iron, folate and vitamin K, one of the most nutrient dense greens. Green Onion - Comes from Wenkai Oriental Vegetables. Roughly chop and store in a container in the fridge or the bottoms in a glass with water. These spring green onions give a delicious fresh crunch to a greens salad or stir fry. Doesn't take a lot of effort, just finely chop up and sprinkle in your lunch and dinner items. I also like it sliced finely and put into a veggie dip or tuna salad. Bunch Beets - Red beets are from Sommerfeld, MB. Remove the beet leaves and store in a greens bag in the fridge. The beets should also go into a bag or container in the fridge as it helps prevent them from going soft. Roast the beets for a sweet earthiness or shred them and make your own Colourful Beet Salad with spinach. If left too long you can also juice them or add to a smoothie. Tomatoes - These are grown at Greenland Gardens. This is a greenhouse so you will notice how the tomatoes look absolutely perfect. Store on the counter or fridge, and slice for burgers, sandwiches, salads, etc. I like to dice them and make a quick salsa or bruschetta. Potatoes - These potatoes are from Dennis at Oak Valley Vegetables. They are large red or yellow storage potatoes from the Fall harvest. Store them in the bag in a cool pantry or basement. Very easy to prepare, you can cut into wedges and grill on the BBQ or chop up boil and then mix in with some greens. This recipe for Roasted Root Vegetables can be done with your potatoes, radish, turnips and beets all together. Romaine - Lettuce comes from Peter at St. Francis Xavier. Store in the fridge crisper. Chop up and place in a bag for easy access when making your sandwiches, wraps, salads, etc. I haven't tried Grilled Romaine but I've only heard good things about it!  

Full Gourmet Produce: to receive a minimum of 11 of the following 13 items

Cherry Tomatoes - A pint of tomatoes are from Nico at Twin River Gardens. Store on a cool counter or in the fridge. They make for a great little snack or addition to a veggie tray. Also works well with some basil in a pasta salad or flatbread. This Pasta with Tomatoes, Basil and Spinach is from the Crampton's Recipe page. Rhubarb - The rhubarb is grown at Twin River Gardens. Best stored with the root ends in water but for fridge space sake you might want to chop it up and put it in a bag in the fridge or freezer. There's all kinds of recipes out there for rhubarb muffins or cake, an example being this one by Genius Kitchen. I recently made stewed rhubarb which is super easy and flavourful. You simply cook down the 1 inch pieces of rhubarb in a sauce pan with a bit of water, sugar and vanilla. Store in a container in the fridge. Bok Choy - This comes from Jonathan's Farm. Bok Choy is a type of Chinese cabbage, that has crunchy white ends and dark leafy greens. Store in the fridge in a sealed bag. I would slice it all up and sauté into a stir fry or noodle dish. It can also be marinaded and grilled or put into an asian soup. Turnip Bunch - These are from Teulon, MB at Jonathan's Farm. These are made up of the edible roots and leaves. Store them in the crisper. You can cut off the leaves and place in a big bag with all your other greens from the box. Turnips have a slightly milder taste than radishes but the same crunch and earthiness. Peeling not necessary, just cut into wedges and serve raw with a dip or shave into a salad. For a hot side dish, you can roast or sauté them alone or with other veggies. These Roasted Turnips are easy and bring out the sweetness of them! Radishes - The radish bunches are from Hearts & Roots. They come in a mix of beautiful colours: red, purple, white and gold.  Store in the crisper with the turnips and save the greens to be eaten so theres no waste! The greens have a nice peppery taste similar to arugula. The radishes have a strong slightly spicy bite so I prefer to slice or shave thinly and add to salads and sandwiches. You could also add these thin slices into a taco, burger or avocado toast. Quarter and roast with the turnips if you prefer them soft. Spinach - Spinach bunches are from Peter at St. Francis Xavier. Rinse the bunch, then pat dry and store in a large ziplock in the fridge. Great for smoothies, salads with fruit, or a turkey spinach burger for the grill! Or try Erin Crampton's delicious Spinach Goma Ae recipe.  Spinach is super high in iron, folate and vitamin K, one of the most nutrient dense greens. Arugula - The arugula bunch comes from Jonathan's Farm. This peppery thin leafy green is a popular addition to a pizza, flatbread, salad or pasta salad.  This Herb Roasted Potato and Arugula Salad would make for a great side dish. Green Onion - Comes from Wenkai Oriental Vegetables. Roughly chop and store in a container in the fridge or the bottoms in a glass with water. These spring green onions give a delicious fresh crunch to a greens salad or stir fry. Doesn't take a lot of effort, just finely chop up and sprinkle in your lunch and dinner items. I also like it sliced finely and put into a veggie dip or tuna salad. Bunch Beets - Red beets are from Sommerfeld, MB. Remove the beet leaves and store in a greens bag in the fridge. The beets should also go into a bag or container in the fridge as it helps prevent them from going soft. Roast the beets for a sweet earthiness or shred them and make your own Colourful Beet Salad with spinach. If left too long you can also juice them or add to a smoothie. Tomatoes - These are grown at Greenland Gardens. This is a greenhouse so you will notice how the tomatoes look absolutely perfect. Store on the counter or fridge, and slice for burgers, sandwiches, salads, etc. I like to dice them and make a quick salsa or bruschetta. Potatoes - These potatoes are from Dennis at Oak Valley Vegetables. They are a multicolour mix from the Fall harvest. Store them in the bag in a cool pantry or basement. Very easy to prepare, you can cut into wedges and grill on the BBQ or chop up boil and then mix in with some greens. This recipe for Roasted Root Vegetables can be done with your potatoes, radish, turnips and beets all together. Romaine - Lettuce comes from Peter at St. Francis Xavier. Store in the fridge crisper. Chop up and place in a bag for easy access when making your sandwiches, wraps, salads, etc. I haven't tried Grilled Romaine but I've only heard good things about it! Herbs - Either cilantro, basil or rosemary are delivered by Joanne. Great fresh add in to chicken or meat marinades, pasta salads or potatoes.  

Half Gourmet Produce: to receive a minimum of 10 of the following 12 items

Cherry Tomatoes - A pint of tomatoes are from Nico at Twin River Gardens. Store on a cool counter or in the fridge. They make for a great little snack or addition to a veggie tray. Also works well with some basil in a pasta salad or flatbread. This Pasta with Tomatoes, Basil and Spinach is from the Crampton's Recipe page. Rhubarb - The rhubarb is grown at Twin River Gardens. Best stored with the root ends in water but for fridge space sake you might want to chop it up and put it in a bag in the fridge or freezer. There's all kinds of recipes out there for rhubarb muffins or cake, an example being this one by Genius Kitchen. I recently made stewed rhubarb which is super easy and flavourful. You simply cook down the 1 inch pieces of rhubarb in a sauce pan with a bit of water, sugar and vanilla. Store in a container in the fridge. Bok Choy - This comes from Jonathan's Farm. Bok Choy is a type of Chinese cabbage, that has crunchy white ends and dark leafy greens. Store in the fridge in a sealed bag. I would slice it all up and sauté into a stir fry or noodle dish. It can also be marinaded and grilled or put into an asian soup. Radishes - The radish bunches are from Hearts & Roots. They come in a mix of beautiful colours: red, purple, white and gold.  Store in the crisper with the turnips and save the greens to be eaten so theres no waste! The greens have a nice peppery taste similar to arugula. The radishes have a strong slightly spicy bite so I prefer to slice or shave thinly and add to salads and sandwiches. You could also add these thin slices into a taco, burger or avocado toast. Quarter and roast with the turnips if you prefer them soft. Spinach - Spinach bunches are from Peter at St. Francis Xavier. Rinse the bunch, then pat dry and store in a large ziplock in the fridge. Great for smoothies, salads with fruit, or a turkey spinach burger for the grill! Or try Erin Crampton's delicious Spinach Goma Ae recipe.  Spinach is super high in iron, folate and vitamin K, one of the most nutrient dense greens. Arugula - The arugula bunch comes from Jonathan's Farm. This peppery thin leafy green is a popular addition to a pizza, flatbread, salad or pasta salad.  This Herb Roasted Potato and Arugula Salad would make for a great side dish. Green Onion - Comes from Wenkai Oriental Vegetables. Roughly chop and store in a container in the fridge or the bottoms in a glass with water. These spring green onions give a delicious fresh crunch to a greens salad or stir fry. Doesn't take a lot of effort, just finely chop up and sprinkle in your lunch and dinner items. I also like it sliced finely and put into a veggie dip or tuna salad. Bunch Beets - Red beets are from Sommerfeld, MB. Remove the beet leaves and store in a greens bag in the fridge. The beets should also go into a bag or container in the fridge as it helps prevent them from going soft. Roast the beets for a sweet earthiness or shred them and make your own Colourful Beet Salad with spinach. If left too long you can also juice them or add to a smoothie. Tomatoes - These are grown at Greenland Gardens. This is a greenhouse so you will notice how the tomatoes look absolutely perfect. Store on the counter or fridge, and slice for burgers, sandwiches, salads, etc. I like to dice them and make a quick salsa or bruschetta. Potatoes - These potatoes are from Dennis at Oak Valley Vegetables. They are baby potatoes from the Fall harvest. Store them in the bag in a cool pantry or basement. Very easy to prepare, you can cut into wedges and grill on the BBQ or chop up boil and then mix in with some greens. This recipe for Roasted Root Vegetables can be done with your potatoes, radish, turnips and beets all together. Romaine - Lettuce comes from Peter at St. Francis Xavier. Store in the fridge crisper. Chop up and place in a bag for easy access when making your sandwiches, wraps, salads, etc. I haven't tried Grilled Romaine but I've only heard good things about it! Herbs - Either cilantro, basil or rosemary are delivered by Joanne. Great fresh add in to chicken or meat marinades, pasta salads or potatoes.  

Protein Shares

*detailed cooking instructions on the recipes page of cramptonsmarket.com/recipes.
Pork Chops - These are from Ian at Natural Pork. The pigs are raised in roomy clean barns with plenty of natural light, ventilation and fans. They can also go outside whenever they wish and have plenty of room to roam. The pigs are fed a natural feed with no added medications. The pork chops can be marinaded and cooked in the oven or on the BBQ. Beef Minute Steak - This beef is from Spring Creek Farm in Cypress River. The beef is raised naturally and outdoors on rotating pastures which supports holistic and regenerative farming. This is a fully grass fed meat with no added hormones. The beef minute steak is tenderized and thin so it cooks quickly on the grill or in a pan. Great sliced for tacos, fajitas, or in a steak salad. Do not overcook as it will get tough. Slice it against the grain.  Be certain to thaw your grass fed meats and bring to room temperature before cooking. Ground Beef - The ground beef is also from Spring Creek Farm. If making your own burgers or meatballs, mix with something like ground pork because the meat is very lean. Otherwise be careful not to overcook, just a few minutes per side for burgers. You can also use it for a meat sauce, stuffed peppers, etc.

Gourmet Protein Shares

*detailed cooking instructions on the recipes page of cramptonsmarket.com/recipes.
New York Beef Steak - This steak is cut from beef at Spring Creek Farms. The beef is raised naturally on pastures fed an all grass diet. It is very lean so only cook 3 minutes per side on a low temperature BBQ or frying pan.  Be certain to thaw your grass fed meats and bring to room temperature before cooking. Pickerel - Fish is from cold northern Manitoba lakes processed by Bearcat Fisheries. The fish is sustainably caught so no fish that is caught by this fishery goes to waste. This white fish can be flavoured simply with butter and dill or salt and pepper. Bake in the oven for 10-15 minutes or on a grill plate. Once the fish becomes opaque and white it is cooked! Ground Beef - This is certified organic ground beef. Spring Creek farms raises the beef by organic standards and is all grass fed. If making your own burgers or meatballs, mix with something like ground pork because the meat is very lean. Otherwise be careful not to overcook, just a few minutes per side for burgers. You can also use it for a meat sauce, stuffed peppers, etc.