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Freezing Asparagus for the Winter!

May 09, 2019
You can pickle or can asparagus for the winter, but I am much much too lazy for such things.  I'll freeze asparagus as it takes next to no effort. It's...

Sue's Fiddlehead or Asparagus Pasta

May 09, 2019
You have to love our customers.  They love food and cooking as much as I do, and they SHARE their recipes!! Here is Sue's fiddlehead pasta Sue’s Fiddlehead Pasta 2...

Asparagus Chevre Toast...an easy party pleaser

May 09, 2019
Grill your local asparagus as per my "Asparagus on the BBQ" recipe. Take one sliced ciabatta loaf from our bakery. Brush one side of the ciabatta with grape seed oil. ...

Asparagus on the BBQ

May 09, 2019
The only way I will eat asparagus is on the BBQ.  We make this dish at least 3 times a week during asparagus season. Heat your grill to high, then...

Erin's pasta sauce with frozen tomatoes.

May 09, 2019
This is how I make up my pasta in the winter.  Its fresh taste brings a blast of summer memories back. An hour or two before supper get 6 tomatoes...

Fall Foodbox October 30

Using up Produce & Reducing Food Waste

If you're like me, it's a struggle to use up everything I buy, or maybe you're having trouble finishing every item in your food box before it expires. I would challenge you to prevent food waste in November and not throw any old fruits and veggies away. Food waste is a huge problem for Canada. Each year 31 billion dollars of food ends up in landfills or composters. This is not only a problem for consumers and grocery stores but from the farms we get the produce from. Misshapen or sub par produce won't get purchased because of its look or size. Here's one tip on how to reduce waste on an individual level: Go through your fridge once a week and look for items you can make either a soup (potatoes, carrots, beets, parsnips, kale, etc), stir fry (peppers, eggplant, carrots, broccoli, etc), smoothie (boiled beets & carrots, apples, greens) or a salad with (lettuce, greens, kale, squash, herbs, etc). Try making one meal at the end of each week with some wilted or expiring produce before it gets thrown out. You can also freeze items that are starting to fade.  

All Produce Shares

Mint - Mint is from Nico at Twin River Gardens. Store in the fridge in a jar of water with the ends down. It can be used for drinks, salads or desserts. Try a homemade mint tea, mojito or add it to a smoothie for a fresh flavour. You can also make all sorts of chocolate mint desserts with fresh mint like these Mint Chocolate Chip Cookies.  Mint is also common in thai or asian cooking for salads or spring rolls.   Brussel Sprouts - Brussel sprouts are also from Nico at Twin River Gardens. Store in a bag in the fridge for up to 3 weeks. The very outer layer of the sprouts should be peeled off and then cut off the stem because its very tough and thats where it attaches to the stalk. Then I like to half them and roast in the oven or cook in a pan with butter and yellow onions! They also make for a warm Crispy Roasted Shredded Brussel Sprout salad. They're my favourite fall side dish.   Eggplant - Eggplant is from Twin River Gardens. Keep it on the counter or in the pantry, the fridge makes the skin turn brown faster. I'm not a big eggplant person myself but it makes for a very popular and classic Eggplant Parmesan dish. If you're new to eggplant I would probably try that for starters. It can act as sort of a meat substitute for your meatless Monday's or roast them and make a hot eggplant dip (Baba Ganoush).   Rainbow Carrots - Organic carrots are from Oak Valley. Store in the fridge for several weeks. The fact that they're rainbow makes for lots of great colourful recipes. I like slicing them on an angle and roasting in the oven with a mix of things like potatoes, squash and brussel sprouts. They can also be shredded to top a garden salad or use the shreds in muffins, fritters and oatmeal. A coworker made this Carrot Cake with local rainbow carrots and brought us some to Crampton's in the summer... it was so great!   Yellow Onions - Onions are from Oak Valley Vegetables. Store in a pantry or cool dark area for several weeks. The dry shell keeps them intact. Slice up the onion for all your stir fry's, soups and casseroles. If you have lots of onions you can make a french onion soup or onion rings. You might not think too much about a plain old onion but they're actually high in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. They have potential health benefits for reducing the risk of obesity, heart disease and cancer. If you want to get creative, try these vegan Caramelized Onion & Potato Pierogies.    Potatoes - Potatoes are from Oak Valley. Keep in the pantry or cool dark place for several weeks. Try some new potatoes dishes this week like a french onion potato gratin or stuffed baked potatoes with fresh parsley. Potatoes are very versatile plus they store so long so it's the best of both worlds. Save time peeling the potatoes and you will also get the all the vitamins from the skin. Just wash them and chop up! If you have a mandolin or slicer, try this Crispy Leaf Potato dish. They look like baked chips!   Small Beets - Beets are from Oak Valley Vegetables. Best stored in the fridge in a sealed bag for up to 2 weeks. Chop off the ends and peel them if you wish and then I would suggest cubing them and roasting in the oven with olive oil. They can then be topped onto a fall salad or make a roasted beet salad with goat cheese and parsley. They can be eaten raw however I find them too crunchy, another option is boiling them. Any extra boiled pieces can go into a berry smoothie for a bright pink colour!   Flat Leaf Parsley - Parsley is grown at Wild Earth Farms. Store in a jar of water with the stems down - same as the mint for 1 week. It's commonly chopped up and used as a garnish for lots of different dishes, it adds a fresh brightness and makes everything more appetizing right? You can also use it in a homemade salad dressing, marinade or sprinkled on roasted vegetables. You can use the whole bunch in a chimichurri sauce for steak or chicken!   Pie Pumpkin - Pumpkin is from Wild Earth Farms. It can be kept on the counter, pantry or cool basement for up to a few months. It makes a nice little decoration for halloween. This can be made into a soup or a pumpkin pie. Cut in half, scoop out the seeds and roast in the oven for about 30-35 minutes. It can be made into pumpkin pie puree or blended with your other ingredients for a soup. We also recommend a Spiced Apple & Pumpkin Crumble for a delicious fall or winter dessert. Don't forget to save the pumpkin seeds - wash and pat them dry and then they can be roasted with olive oil and your favourite seasoning!   Red Kuri Squash - Squash also from Wild Earth Farms. Store on the counter or in a pantry or basement for up to a few months. This is a red teardrop shaped squash with a bright orange sweet flesh, similar to butternut. Try Crampton's Market Roasted Red Kuri & Coconut Soup or simply roast in wedges and it can be topped with any sort of sauce or seasoning.   Pears & Asian Pears - Pears come from BC. The varieties may be bartlett, anjou or bosc. The asian pears look like  a pale yellow apple and they are in fact crunchy like an apple but have a sweet pear flavour. Great for snacking, or you could make a pear sauce to top ice cream or oatmeal.   Cut Lettuce - Lettuce is from Hearts & Roots in Elie. The heads of lettuce have already had the stems chopped off so just cut into small pieces and its all ready to go for a salad or stuff some into a sandwich or wrap. Use the lettuce for this Fall Salad with Goat cheese, Pears & Candied Pecans.    

Combo Shares

Beefsteak Tomato - Large tomatoes are from Murray at Greenland Gardens. The only way to get fresh tomatoes is from a greenhouse such as this one. The tomatoes are covered and free from the elements so they have no bruises, cuts or discolouration. They're the perfect size to slice for a sandwich or burger. You can also dice it up for a salad or a quick bruschetta to top some chicken or bread. Brussel Sprouts - Brussel sprouts are also from Nico at Twin River Gardens. Store in a bag in the fridge for up to 3 weeks. The very outer layer of the sprouts should be peeled off and then cut off the stem because its very tough and thats where it attaches to the stalk. Then I like to half them and roast in the oven or cook in a pan with butter and yellow onions! They also make for a warm Crispy Roasted Shredded Brussel Sprout salad. They're my favourite fall side dish. Celeriac - Grown by Nico at Twin River Gardens. Store in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. As you can see this is a root vegetable, the root of a celery plant so it has a mild celery taste. The exterior needs to be peeled or cut off, then it can be roasted in cubes or cooked down for a cream of celery soup with potatoes, etc. Rainbow Carrots - Organic carrots are from Oak Valley. Store in the fridge for several weeks. The fact that they're rainbow makes for lots of great colourful recipes. I like slicing them on an angle and roasting in the oven with a mix of things like potatoes, squash and brussel sprouts. They can also be shredded to top a garden salad or use the shreds in muffins, fritters and oatmeal. A coworker made this Carrot Cake with local rainbow carrots and brought us some to Crampton's in the summer... it was so great! Red Onions - Onions are from Oak Valley Vegetables. Store in a pantry or cool dark area for several weeks. The dry shell keeps them intact. Slice up the onion for all your stir fry's, soups and casseroles. This variety is also great for a Greek salad or quinoa salad. You might not think too much about a plain old onion but they're actually high in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. They have potential health benefits for reducing the risk of obesity, heart disease and cancer. If you want to get creative, try these vegan Caramelized Onion & Potato Pierogies.  Spaghetti Squash - Squash is from Wild Earth Farms. Store in the pantry, counter or cool basement for up to a few months. To cook the spaghetti squash you need to cut it in half lengthwise (microwave first if its too hard), then scoop out the seeds and roast the halves in the oven at 375. It will take about 30-35 minutes. The squash is done when the spaghetti strands can be gently scraped out easily. You can then mix in a pasta or meat sauce, or butter and garlic. Butterhead Lettuce - Lettuce is from Neva Hydroponics in Landmark. It's grown with an all water system that has nutrients for the plants to grow. The butterhead lettuce is a great texture for a lettuce wrap or to hold these Asian Meatballs as an appetizer or main meal. Bison Patties - Bison is from Spring Creek Farm. They're raised naturally on rotating pastures and completely grass fed. This produces a lean meat so be careful not to overcook them. Thaw the patties completely first, separate them and then cook for only 3-4 minutes per side on a BBQ turned to low or in a frying pan on medium heat. Enjoy with your favourite burger toppings like the fresh butterhead lettuce and sliced tomato. Chorizo Sausage - Pork sausage is from Spring Creek Farms. The pork is raised ethically and naturally, with roomy barns and lots of outdoor access with dugouts and space for the pigs to exhibit natural behaviours. They're fed no antibiotics, growth hormones or animal by-products. This sausage is spicy so it works well for a classic Zuppa Toscana Soup. You can also crumble the sausage and use it for a taco or a hot spicy dip. I've also chopped it up and mixed it into pasta.