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Freezing Asparagus for the Winter!

May 09, 2019
You can pickle or can asparagus for the winter, but I am much much too lazy for such things.  I'll freeze asparagus as it takes next to no effort. It's...

Sue's Fiddlehead or Asparagus Pasta

May 09, 2019
You have to love our customers.  They love food and cooking as much as I do, and they SHARE their recipes!! Here is Sue's fiddlehead pasta Sue’s Fiddlehead Pasta 2...

Asparagus Chevre Toast...an easy party pleaser

May 09, 2019
Grill your local asparagus as per my "Asparagus on the BBQ" recipe. Take one sliced ciabatta loaf from our bakery. Brush one side of the ciabatta with grape seed oil. ...

Asparagus on the BBQ

May 09, 2019
The only way I will eat asparagus is on the BBQ.  We make this dish at least 3 times a week during asparagus season. Heat your grill to high, then...

Erin's pasta sauce with frozen tomatoes.

May 09, 2019
This is how I make up my pasta in the winter.  Its fresh taste brings a blast of summer memories back. An hour or two before supper get 6 tomatoes...

Fall Foodbox November 27

Vitamins and Do we Need Them

Many of us take vitamins, we may not know why, but to "boost our health" or "keep us healthy", however supplements don't offer us the benefits of vitamin rich foods such as fruits and vegetables. The only thing that vitamins can "cure" is a deficiency of that particular vitamin. It's not to say that multivitamins are bad or don't do anything for us, but we can give them more credit than deserved, and use them to make up for bad diets. One vitamin we may need supplementation this season is vitamin D which helps support bone health, the kidneys and small intestine. Our bodies rely on sunlight to maintain adequate vitamin D stores. Theres a vitamin D precursor that moves to the skin to help convert vitamin D to its active form. Without adequate sunlight we lack this conversion. From the months of November - April, we lack this access to vitamin D and rely on the few food sources which are eggs, liver, some fatty fish and milk.  

All Produce Shares are to Receive a Minimum of 9 of the Following 11 Items

Frozen Heirloom Tomatoes - Tomatoes are from Earthly Design in Vermette, Manitoba. Keep in the freezer until thawing in a bowl of cold water. The skins should peel off easily with this thawing method. Since they've been frozen at their peak ripeness, they have lots of flavour once thawed and you can make an easy sauce by simmering them down in a deep pan or pot. They can also be added whole to a stew or chili. Try this Tomato Basil Sauce with the frozen tomatoes from Livestrong.   Radishes - Radish bunches are from Nico at Twin River Gardens. Store in the fridge with the leaves which can be eaten and have the flavour of arugula. The leaves could also be blended with the basil to make a pesto or sauce. Cut off the stem end and slice the radishes thinly for a salad, sandwich, or bagel. They add a spicy bite! They're commonly roasted as well in halves or quarters.   Butterhead Lettuce - Lettuce is from Neva Hydroponics in Landmark. It comes in a plastic container and the lettuce roots can be planted for regrowth. Store in the fridge for 1 week or more. The butterhead is a little bit thicker and holds up well to use it for lettuce wraps and doesn't go soggy in a sandwich. The freshwater system its grown in keeps it fresh and crisp. Try this Butterhead Lettuce Salad with Radish and Peas for a light refreshing side dish.   Butternut Squash - Winter squash is from Wild Earth Farms. Store in a cool pantry, basement or on the counter for up to a few months. Roast the squash in little cubes and use it in a curry, to top a salad or in a soup. My favourite recipe is a curried butternut squash soup. It's super simple: onions, garlic, curry powder, chicken stock and squash. This squash makes such a smooth and creamy sauce its great for pasta or a lasagna. This Chicken & Wild Rice Casserole with Butternut Squash and Cranberries would be great for the holidays.   Beefsteak Tomatoes - Tomatoes are from Murray at Greenland Gardens. It's a greenhouse in Ste. Anne Manitoba. Store on the counter for about 1 week or in the freezer in a ziplock bag. You can make a simple salad with fresh chopped up tomato basil and mozzarella. Or try a bruschetta on crisp baguette for an appetizer. The tomato and basil can also be used for a grilled sandwich or in a tomato sauce for pasta!   Basil - Fresh basil is from Neva Hydroponics in Landmark, Manitoba. It's best stored out on the counter but only for about 1 week or less. Slice the leaves thinly for a homemade sauce, tomato soup or on top of a tomato salad. Try these Tomato Basil Mozzarella Toasts to go with dinner. You can also blend up all the basil with any other greens you have for a pesto to top chicken or fish!   Orange Carrots - Carrots are grown at Oak Valley Vegetables. They're storage carrots so they have a lower water content and can be stored in a cool basement or fridge for several weeks. Peel, cut off the ends and slice up for all your stir fry's, stews, roasts and soups. They also make cakes and carrot muffins super moist and delicious. Another kid favourite is sliced boiled carrots with honey.   Yellow Potatoes - Potatoes are from Oak Valley Vegetables. They're storage potatoes so they can be kept in a cool pantry, basement or fridge for at least a few weeks. They can be peeled but don't have to be. Chop up to add to your roasts, a pan with chicken or vegetables, you can make lemon roasted potatoes for a greek dinner or use in a Potato Leek Soup. Onions can replace leeks in that recipe.   Onions - Onions are also grown at Oak Valley Vegetables. The dry shell keeps them shelf stable for at least a couple weeks in the pantry or cupboard. Slice up as the base for some stir fry's, noodle bowls or soups! Onions contain anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects and have been linked to lowering cancer risk. This Pan Fried Onion Dip is great for chips or veggies for a weekend snack!   Red Cabbage - Cabbage is from Oak Valley Vegetables. Store the red cabbage whole in the fridge, then remove leaves one at a time, or cut off wedges. You can make a red cabbage and carrot slaw by slicing/shredding them thinly. For long term storage, it can be pickled and put in jars. This cabbage adds a beautiful colour to so many salads like this Red Cabbage Salad with Creamy Avocado Dressing.   Pie Pumpkin - Pumpkin is from Wild Earth Farms. Store in the pantry, basement or on the counter for 2 months or more. The pumpkin can obviously be used for pumpkin pie, it has to be cut in half or quarters, roasted for 30-45 minutes, then scoop out the flesh, simmer in a pot with some water and blend until smooth. The pumpkin can also just be roasted to have as a side dish, or made into a Coconut Pumpkin Soup.

Combo Shares are to Receive a Minimum of 6 of the Following 7 Items

Frozen Heirloom Tomatoes - Tomatoes are from Earthly Design in Vermette, Manitoba. Keep in the freezer until thawing in a bowl of cold water. The skins should peel off easily with this thawing method. Since they've been frozen at their peak ripeness, they have lots of flavour once thawed and you can make an easy sauce by simmering them down in a deep pan or pot. The sauce goes great with white fish and they can be simmered together. They can also be added whole to a stew or chili. Try this Tomato Basil Sauce using frozen tomatoes, from Livestrong. Radishes - Radish bunches are from Nico at Twin River Gardens. Store in the fridge with the leaves which can be eaten and have the flavour of arugula. The leaves could also be blended with the basil to make a pesto or sauce. Cut off the stem end and slice the radishes thinly for a salad, sandwich, or bagel. They add a spicy bite! They're commonly roasted as well in halves or quarters. Green Leaf Lettuce - Lettuce is grown at Neva Hydroponics in Landmark. It's an all-water system with nutrients delivered to the greens through the water. The green leaf lettuce is crisp but then so lots can be stuffed into a sandwich, make a light salad, or chop up and sprinkle on some nachos or use in a taco dip. Orange Carrots - Carrots are grown at Oak Valley Vegetables. They're storage carrots so they have a lower water content and can be stored in a cool basement or fridge for several weeks. Peel, cut off the ends and slice up for all your stir fry's, stews, roasts and soups. They also make cakes and carrot muffins super moist and delicious. Another kid favourite is sliced boiled carrots with honey. Red Creamer Potatoes - Potatoes are from Oak Valley Vegetables. They're storage potatoes so they can be kept in a cool pantry, basement or fridge for at least a few weeks. They can be peeled but don't have to be. Chop up to add to your roasts, a pan with chicken or vegetables, you can make lemon roasted potatoes for a greek dinner or use in a Potato Leek Soup. Onions can replace leeks in that recipe. White Fish - Fish comes from the northern Manitoba lakes and fished by Barry. He catches the fish sustainably by throwing no injured fish back into the lakes. He's also excellent at filleting and deboning the fish himself. You can braise this fish in a pan in some sauce, fry it up for 5-10 minutes or bake it in the oven. It doesn't have a lot of flavour, you could squeeze on some lemon juice, use a seasoning or as I mentioned a sauce. Try this Baked White Fish with a Parmesan Herb Crust.   Italian Chicken Sausage - Sausage is made in Oak Island. They raise chickens ethically and naturally by using low density barns, and allowing chickens free access to the outdoors in summer. This sausage is so flavourful and can be eaten on its own whole, or chopped up for a pasta dish! You can also bake the sausage with peppers and onions or use pieces to stuff peppers or zucchini.