Featured Article

Freezing Asparagus for the Winter!

May 09, 2019
You can pickle or can asparagus for the winter, but I am much much too lazy for such things.  I'll freeze asparagus as it takes next to no effort. It's...

Sue's Fiddlehead or Asparagus Pasta

May 09, 2019
You have to love our customers.  They love food and cooking as much as I do, and they SHARE their recipes!! Here is Sue's fiddlehead pasta Sue’s Fiddlehead Pasta 2...

Asparagus Chevre Toast...an easy party pleaser

May 09, 2019
Grill your local asparagus as per my "Asparagus on the BBQ" recipe. Take one sliced ciabatta loaf from our bakery. Brush one side of the ciabatta with grape seed oil. ...

Asparagus on the BBQ

May 09, 2019
The only way I will eat asparagus is on the BBQ.  We make this dish at least 3 times a week during asparagus season. Heat your grill to high, then...

Erin's pasta sauce with frozen tomatoes.

May 09, 2019
This is how I make up my pasta in the winter.  Its fresh taste brings a blast of summer memories back. An hour or two before supper get 6 tomatoes...

Fall Food Box

Produce Box

The Produce Box will have at least 9 of the 11 items listed below.

Pie Pumpkin

These Pie Pumpkins are from Wild Earth Farms. Pie Pumpkin is sweet with a dark yellow to orange flesh that's moist. You can cut it into slices and roast it or peel the pumpkin and cut it into cubes to roast. You can eat the flesh of a pie pumpkin if you roast it in moist heat. Cut in half, scoop out seeds, roast and use the flesh for pies, soups, stews. You can add the cooked flesh to pumpkin muffins or smoothies. 

Red Onion

These Red Onions are from Wild Earth Farms. These onions are lovely for burgers, sandwiches or salads. Don't like the strong flavour of raw onions? Try soaking them in a bowl of cold water before: slice onions, soak for 10 minutes, stirring a couple of times, drain, pat dry and use. store in a cool, dry place, but away from other fruit and veggies as they produce ethylene gas. 

Red Cabbage

The Red Cabbage is from Wild Earth Farms. It has a good source of manganese, dietary fibre, potassium, vitamin B1, folate and copper. Cabbage is a tasty way to eat healthy! Shred-it as a slaw or salad - it's firm leaves don't wilt like others in the brassica family.

Store this wrapped loosely in a plastic bag in the crisper.

Collards

These collards come from Wild Earth Farm. Wash well, dry, chop and fry in bacon fat - this is the traditional way to eat Collard Greens. Store them in the crisper, if it wilts trim the ends of the stalks, soak in cold water for 20 minutes, pat dry, wrap in a clean towel and put back in the fridge.

Watermelon Radish

Watermelon Radish is from Nico at Twin River Gardens. Want to try something different with your radishes? Oven roast them. When they are roasted they are sweet and savoury and juicy and delicious. Store in the fridge. 

Tomatillos

Tomatillos are from Nico at Twin River Gardens. Known also as the husk tomato, Tomatillos are a member of the nightshade family and are a staple in Mexican cooking. You peel off outside skin and the inside looks similar to a tomato. Store them with the husks removed, in a plastic bag in the fridge.

Cocktail Tomato

Cocktail Tomatoes are from Greenland Gardens. These are great in salads or as a side to your dinner meal. Store in the fridge. 

Brussel Sprouts

Brussel Sprouts are in Jonothan Farms. Preheat your oven to 350, brush the sprouts with a mix of olive oil, honey, salt and pepper, roast for 40-45 minutes until sprouts are evenly browned.  Wrap in a plastic bag and store in the crisper. 

Rainbow Carrots

Rainbow Carrots are from Blue Lagoon.

Read about the colour of your carrots - Orange: Beta and alpha-carotene pigment. This promotes vitamin A production by the body, which is essential for healthy eyes.

Purple: Anthocyanin, beta and alpha-carotene pigment. Purple carrots typically have an orange core, and their pigment-related nutrients may provide additional vitamin A and prevent heart disease.

Red: Lycopene and beta-carotene pigment. Lycopene is the same red pigment that gives tomatoes their deep colour and is linked to a lower risk of certain cancers, such as prostate cancer.

Yellow: Xanthophykks and lutein. Both are linked to cancer prevention and better eye health.

White: The nutrients don’t come from the pigment but from the fibre, which promotes healthy digestion.

Store your carrots in a bag in the fridge. 

Swiss Chard

Swiss Chard is from Blue Lagoon. A fabulously tasty superfood, Chard is versatile.  You can chop it into salads, turn it into a wrap, or make into a pesto. I love Chard for breakfast. Wash your chard up. Chop it into pieces, sautee in butter, bacon fat or oil with garlic scapes until wilted. Season with salt and pepper and put on a plate. Then fry an egg over easy with a runny yolk (you could also poach the egg). Slide the egg on top of your sauteed chard, prick the yolk and let it run all over the chard. Eat it up! 

Keep it in the crisper with its' buddy Kale. If it starts to wilt, trip the ends of the stalks, soak in cold water for 20 minutes, pat dry and wrap in a clean towel and put back in the fridge.

Organic Asian Pears

From B.C. They have a crunchy texture and sweet flesh. Consumed as a flesh-eating fruit. 

Mixed Box

The Mixed box will have at least 5 of the 7 items listed below and 2 proteins. 

Pie Pumpkin

These Pie Pumpkins are from Wild Earth Farms. Pie Pumpkin is sweet with a dark yellow to orange flesh that's moist. You can cut it into slices and roast it or peel the pumpkin and cut it into cubes to roast. You can eat the flesh of a pie pumpkin if you roast it in moist heat. Cut in half, scoop out seeds, roast and use the flesh for pies, soups, stews. You can add the cooked flesh to pumpkin muffins or smoothies. 

Red Onion

These Red Onions are from Wild Earth Farms. These onions are lovely for burgers, sandwiches or salads. Don't like the strong flavour of raw onions? Try soaking them in a bowl of cold water before: slice onions, soak for 10 minutes, stirring a couple of times, drain, pat dry and use. store in a cool, dry place, but away from other fruit and veggies as they produce ethylene gas. 

Red Cabbage

The Red Cabbage is from Wild Earth Farms. It has a good source of manganese, dietary fibre, potassium, vitamin B1, folate and copper. Cabbage is a tasty way to eat healthy! Shred-it as a slaw or salad - it's firm leaves don't wilt like others in the brassica family.

Store this wrapped loosely in a plastic bag in the crisper.

Rosemary

Rosemary is from Nico at Twin River Gardens. Store with the stems down in a glass of water or in a container/bag on the counter for up to 2 weeks. Rosemary goes great with the garlic scapes on roasted potatoes or chopped up and sprinkled on a chicken or turkey. 

Beefsteak Tomato

Tomatoes are from Greenland Gardens - a greenhouse in St. Anne, MB. Store on the counter or in the fridge for 1-2 weeks. They're nice large tomatoes, free from the blemishes that wind and rain induce. Perfect to slice for toasted tomato sandwiches, burgers, or veggie pizza. 

Spinach

Spinach is from Jonathan's Farm in St. Andrews. Store in a sealed bag in the fridge for 1-2 weeks. I put a handful into my eggs and on top of my pizza. I also mix spinach into any salad for more variety. 

Orange Carrots

Carrots are from Jonathan's Farm in St. Andrews. Store in the fridge crisper or a cool dry place for 3 weeks or more. For raw eating, peel cut up and store in a glass container of water in the fridge. They can be boiled, roasted or added to a slow cooker stew/roast. 

Protein

Free Run Eggs

These free run eggs are from Natures Farm located in Steinback, Manitoba. They care about the wellbeing of hens and have implemented an innovative free-run ‘birdhouse.’ This birdhouse is made to incorporate natural features such as sheltered, darkened nest boxes, scratching and dustbathing areas, and elevated multi-level perches that enable the birds to roos, fly freely, and to ‘populate’ the vertical dimension of the birdhouse.

Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast

This chicken breast is from Oak Island. Versatile lean white chicken breast is easy and quick to cook and can be the basis of a meal made in minutes. A really handy standby for when you're under time pressure, try whole breasts dipped in flour, beaten egg and breadcrumbs. Useful for everything from fajitas to stir-fries.

Try this:

Remove the chicken out of the packaging, pat dry and bring to room temperature. Preheat your griddle or heavy-based frying pan to a low temperature. Season the breast just prior to cooking. Put the chicken breast into a baking dish with 50ml of water or chicken stock place in a preheated oven at 350°F for 25 to 30 minutes for a moist breast. Remove from the oven.