Featured Article

Freezing Asparagus for the Winter!

May 09, 2019
You can pickle or can asparagus for the winter, but I am much much too lazy for such things.  I'll freeze asparagus as it takes next to no effort. It's...

Sue's Fiddlehead or Asparagus Pasta

May 09, 2019
You have to love our customers.  They love food and cooking as much as I do, and they SHARE their recipes!! Here is Sue's fiddlehead pasta Sue’s Fiddlehead Pasta 2...

Asparagus Chevre Toast...an easy party pleaser

May 09, 2019
Grill your local asparagus as per my "Asparagus on the BBQ" recipe. Take one sliced ciabatta loaf from our bakery. Brush one side of the ciabatta with grape seed oil. ...

Asparagus on the BBQ

May 09, 2019
The only way I will eat asparagus is on the BBQ.  We make this dish at least 3 times a week during asparagus season. Heat your grill to high, then...

Erin's pasta sauce with frozen tomatoes.

May 09, 2019
This is how I make up my pasta in the winter.  Its fresh taste brings a blast of summer memories back. An hour or two before supper get 6 tomatoes...

CSA pick up July 21/22

Hello all Boy is everyone glad that the heat and humidity have given us a break.  One of our producers told us that their greenhouse had gotten up to 45 degrees inside during those sweltering days!!!!  I can't imagine working in that! Have you heard of the 'curse of knowledge'?  Once you know something really well, you forget that other people don't know it.  That's the curse.  Some CSA participants have been asking for more information on storing their produce.   Of course!!  I should be including that!  I just suffer from the curse.  Thank you for the great suggestion, storage methods will now be listed by the item. Please remember to eat your shares from the top down as the most perishable items are listed on the top, and the least perishable on the bottom.

Full Gourmet Shares to receive a minimum of 9 of the following items

Summer Savory- Organic- This is the herb that best compliments peas and beans.  Just wash, finely chop, and sprinkle on top of cooked peas and beans.  3 sisters soup (made of corn, beans and squash) is best seasoned with summer savory.  Store in plastic in your crisper for up to a week.  If you don't use it within a week, hang upside down (not in plastic), in a well ventilated area and allow to dry.  Savory is fabulous dry Baby Dill- Spray free- As you have potatoes in your share baby dill is a must.  Wash and boil your potatoes until tender.  Drain the water, add a knob of butter to the pot, the juice of half a lemon, and half a bunch of dill finely shopped.    Store in a plastic bag in your fridge for up to a week.  To preserve for winter use, rinse dill , remove elastic band and place whole bunch in a blender.  Add enough water (about 1/3 cup) so that when you blend the dill it makes a slurry.   Freeze this slurry in ice cube trays.  Once frozen, pop out, put in a freezer safe container and keep in the freezer for future use. Sour Cherries- Spray Free-   Store in the coldest part of your fridge, unwashed, uncovered, for no more than 5 days.  Though they are called spray free these sour cherries are from Bob and Betty at Plum ridge farm.  Bob and Betty have been farming at a level above and beyond organic since the 70's.  I want to be Betty when I grow up.   These cherries have a tart kick, they are great fresh, but really shine in desserts and sauces.  I like to make sour cherry liquor with them.  I just mix the cherries with about half a cup of sugar until the juices start to run.  Then I top with a cup and a half of vodka.  Stir it all up, place in a mason jar and let sit for about 3 months.  Shake or stir once a week or so.  After 3 months, strain the liquid and it makes the perfect Christmas dessert sipper. Raspberries- Spray free-  Store unwashed, uncovered, in your fridge, for no more than 2-3 days.  It's raspberry season and today's recipe card calls for a raspberry dressing.  Though I can polish off a pint of raspberries just on my own, the local berries make the most beautiful dressings and desserts.  Local raspberries are grown for their flavour, not their shelf life.  They are soft, and smushy looking, they leak through the pint and attract fruit flied if left on your counter for more than a second.  But boy are they delicious.  When you taste local raspberries beside the imports, it makes you wonder why we even bother bringing produce in from California.  If you can't eat these babies right away, please remove them from the pint, pop them in a freezer safe container (removing any leaves or debris that you see), and pop in the freezer for a winter treat. Tomatoes-Spray Free- Never put a whole tomato in your fridge.  The fridge is too cold and breaks down the tomato at the cellular level leaving you with a grainy watery tomato.  Keep them on a paper towel on your counter and eat them within 5 days.  If you cut into your tomato, then you should put the cut bit in the fridge.  Sometimes you have to sacrifice texture for food safety. Fennel-Spray Free- Like other leafy type things, a fridge wicks the moisture from the fennel, leaving it limp.  Just pop the whole thing in a plastic bag to prevent moisture loss, and store in your fridge for up to 10 days.  Chop the ferny leaves up to add to a salad dressing, roast or grill the bulb or finely slice the whole thing to make a beautiful Italian Salad with grapefruit, Fennel and thinly sliced raw golden beets. Beans-Spray Free-The local beans that we have at the store are all hand picked.  This means that if you pop them in a plastic bag in your fridge they'll last 7-14 days.  No joke.  Imported and inexpensive local beans are mechanically harvested.  The metal fingers of the harvester scrape the bean, then the beans go through a wash to remove any debris.  This process means that within 48 hours of harvest, the beans start to oxidize where the metal fingers scratched the bean, leaving brown rust lines which then start to spoil.  Hand picked beans (which is what you have) are picked by human hands.  No scrape marks, no broken beans, no spoiling.  It's much more expensive as humans are more costly than machines, but the end product is just so much more wonderful. Sugar Snap Peas- Organic-Sugar snap peas are a cross between an English shelling pea and a snow pea!  So you get tasty peas inside AND a tasty shell!  Store them in a covered container in your fridge for 7-10 days.  But really, considering you can eat them raw or cooked, dipped in hummus to tossed in for a fast fry, you'll eat them within the first few days. Carrots, Bunched, Spray Free- Everyone always wants us to chop the tops off of the carrots that they buy in the store, but we have already packed your bags for you, so you don't get that option.  Take this opportunity to wash, then blend up some of your carrot tops with water.  Freeze the slurry in ice cube trays, and use this in soups in the winter.  Carrot tops taste of strong fresh parsley.  Store your carrots in plastic in your fridge for up to 14 days. Potatoes- Organic-At this time of year potatoes are considered 'new'.  A new potato can be large or small.  Size doesn't matter.  What you're looking for is a skin that peels off  with firm thumb pressure.  They have a high water, low starch content which makes them creamy and sweet and delicious.  You have to store them in your fridge or they will turn brown very quickly.  Wash them up, boil them, and top with dill and butter and a squish of lime.  Store new potatoes in plastic in your fridge for up to 2 weeks.  In the fall, potatoes start to build up starches in an attempt to survive the winter.  This gives fall or winter potatoes their more grainy texture. Kholrabi- Spray Free-Remember those two tiny delicious Kholrabi that you had in your first share, they have grown up, lost their leaves (they got damaged in some hail so were cut off).  You can make that delicious slaw that you have a recipe for, or peel, chop, toss with oil and roast at 350 until tender and sweet.  Store in your fridge for up to 3 weeks. Gold Beets- Spray free- Golden beets taste like a cross between a carrot and a beet.  They are not actually a cross between a carrot and a beet, they are just a different kind of beet.  Less earthy, more sweet.  It's a great eat raw, sliced thinly on salads, boil then peel, slice and fry in butter, or bake until tender.  You can also turn Beets into chips!! Slice thinly, toss with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and bake at 300 until crisp!  Store in your fridge in plastic for up to 3 months

Full Shares to contain a minimum of 7 of the following items

Summer Savory- Organic- This is the herb that best compliments peas and beans.  Just wash, finely chop, and sprinkle on top of cooked peas and beans.  3 sisters soup (made of corn, beans and squash) is best seasoned with summer savory.  Store in plastic in your crisper for up to a week.  If you don't use it within a week, hang upside down (not in plastic), in a well ventilated area and allow to dry.  Savory is fabulous dry Baby Dill- Spray free- As you have potatoes in your share baby dill is a must.  Wash and boil your potatoes until tender.  Drain the water, add a knob of butter to the pot, the juice of half a lemon, and half a bunch of dill finely shopped.    Store in a plastic bag in your fridge for up to a week.  To preserve for winter use, rinse dill , remove elastic band and place whole bunch in a blender.  Add enough water (about 1/3 cup) so that when you blend the dill it makes a slurry.   Freeze this slurry in ice cube trays.  Once frozen, pop out, put in a freezer safe container and keep in the freezer for future use. Raspberries- Spray free-  Store unwashed, uncovered, in your fridge, for no more than 2-3 days.  It's raspberry season and today's recipe card calls for a raspberry dressing.  Though I can polish off a pint of raspberries just on my own, the local berries make the most beautiful dressings and desserts.  Local raspberries are grown for their flavour, not their shelf life.  They are soft, and smushy looking, they leak through the pint and attract fruit flied if left on your counter for more than a second.  But boy are they delicious.  When you taste local raspberries beside the imports, it makes you wonder why we even bother bringing produce in from California.  If you can't eat these babies right away, please remove them from the pint, pop them in a freezer safe container (removing any leaves or debris that you see), and pop in the freezer for a winter treat. Beans-Spray Free-The local beans that we have at the store are all hand picked.  This means that if you pop them in a plastic bag in your fridge they'll last 7-14 days.  No joke.  Imported and inexpensive local beans are mechanically harvested.  The metal fingers of the harvester scrape the bean, then the beans go through a wash to remove any debris.  This process means that within 48 hours of harvest, the beans start to oxidize where the metal fingers scratched the bean, leaving brown rust lines which then start to spoil.  Hand picked beans (which is what you have) are picked by human hands.  No scrape marks, no broken beans, no spoiling.  It's much more expensive as humans are more costly than machines, but the end product is just so much more wonderful. Sugar Snap Peas- Organic-Sugar snap peas are a cross between an English shelling pea and a snow pea!  So you get tasty peas inside AND a tasty shell!  Store them in a covered container in your fridge for 7-10 days.  But really, considering you can eat them raw or cooked, dipped in hummus to tossed in for a fast fry, you'll eat them within the first few days. Carrots, Bunched, Spray Free- Everyone always wants us to chop the tops off of the carrots that they buy in the store, but we have already packed your bags for you, so you don't get that option.  Take this opportunity to wash, then blend up some of your carrot tops with water.  Freeze the slurry in ice cube trays, and use this in soups in the winter.  Carrot tops taste of strong fresh parsley.  Store your carrots in plastic in your fridge for up to 14 days. Potatoes- Organic-At this time of year potatoes are considered 'new'.  A new potato can be large or small.  Size doesn't matter.  What you're looking for is a skin that peels off  with firm thumb pressure.  They have a high water, low starch content which makes them creamy and sweet and delicious.  You have to store them in your fridge or they will turn brown very quickly.  Wash them up, boil them, and top with dill and butter and a squish of lime.  Store new potatoes in plastic in your fridge for up to 2 weeks.  In the fall, potatoes start to build up starches in an attempt to survive the winter.  This gives fall or winter potatoes their more grainy texture. Kholrabi- Spray Free-Remember those two tiny delicious Kholrabi that you had in your first share, they have grown up, lost their leaves (they got damaged in some hail so were cut off).  You can make that delicious slaw that you have a recipe for, or peel, chop, toss with oil and roast at 350 until tender and sweet.  Store in your fridge for up to 3 weeks. Gold Beets- Spray free- Golden beets taste like a cross between a carrot and a beet.  They are not actually a cross between a carrot and a beet, they are just a different kind of beet.  Less earthy, more sweet.  It's a great eat raw, sliced thinly on salads, boil then peel, slice and fry in butter, or bake until tender.  You can also turn Beets into chips!! Slice thinly, toss with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and bake at 300 until crisp!  Store in your fridge in plastic for up to 3 months

Half Gourmet Shares to contain a minimum of 9 of the following items

Summer Savory- Organic- This is the herb that best compliments peas and beans.  Just wash, finely chop, and sprinkle on top of cooked peas and beans.  3 sisters soup (made of corn, beans and squash) is best seasoned with summer savory.  Store in plastic in your crisper for up to a week.  If you don't use it within a week, hang upside down (not in plastic), in a well ventilated area and allow to dry.  Savory is fabulous dry Baby Dill- Spray free- As you have potatoes in your share baby dill is a must.  Wash and boil your potatoes until tender.  Drain the water, add a knob of butter to the pot, the juice of half a lemon, and half a bunch of dill finely shopped.    Store in a plastic bag in your fridge for up to a week.  To preserve for winter use, rinse dill , remove elastic band and place whole bunch in a blender.  Add enough water (about 1/3 cup) so that when you blend the dill it makes a slurry.   Freeze this slurry in ice cube trays.  Once frozen, pop out, put in a freezer safe container and keep in the freezer for future use. Sour Cherries- Spray Free-   Store in the coldest part of your fridge, unwashed, uncovered, for no more than 5 days.  Though they are called spray free these sour cherries are from Bob and Betty at Plum ridge farm.  Bob and Betty have been farming at a level above and beyond organic since the 70's.  I want to be Betty when I grow up.   These cherries have a tart kick, they are great fresh, but really shine in desserts and sauces.  I like to make sour cherry liquor with them.  I just mix the cherries with about half a cup of sugar until the juices start to run.  Then I top with a cup and a half of vodka.  Stir it all up, place in a mason jar and let sit for about 3 months.  Shake or stir once a week or so.  After 3 months, strain the liquid and it makes the perfect Christmas dessert sipper. Raspberries- Spray free-  Store unwashed, uncovered, in your fridge, for no more than 2-3 days.  It's raspberry season and today's recipe card calls for a raspberry dressing.  Though I can polish off a pint of raspberries just on my own, the local berries make the most beautiful dressings and desserts.  Local raspberries are grown for their flavour, not their shelf life.  They are soft, and smushy looking, they leak through the pint and attract fruit flied if left on your counter for more than a second.  But boy are they delicious.  When you taste local raspberries beside the imports, it makes you wonder why we even bother bringing produce in from California.  If you can't eat these babies right away, please remove them from the pint, pop them in a freezer safe container (removing any leaves or debris that you see), and pop in the freezer for a winter treat. Tomatoes-Spray Free- Never put a whole tomato in your fridge.  The fridge is too cold and breaks down the tomato at the cellular level leaving you with a grainy watery tomato.  Keep them on a paper towel on your counter and eat them within 5 days.  If you cut into your tomato, then you should put the cut bit in the fridge.  Sometimes you have to sacrifice texture for food safety. Fennel-Spray Free- Like other leafy type things, a fridge wicks the moisture from the fennel, leaving it limp.  Just pop the whole thing in a plastic bag to prevent moisture loss, and store in your fridge for up to 10 days.  Chop the ferny leaves up to add to a salad dressing, roast or grill the bulb or finely slice the whole thing to make a beautiful Italian Salad with grapefruit, Fennel and thinly sliced raw golden beets. Beans-Spray Free-The local beans that we have at the store are all hand picked.  This means that if you pop them in a plastic bag in your fridge they'll last 7-14 days.  No joke.  Imported and inexpensive local beans are mechanically harvested.  The metal fingers of the harvester scrape the bean, then the beans go through a wash to remove any debris.  This process means that within 48 hours of harvest, the beans start to oxidize where the metal fingers scratched the bean, leaving brown rust lines which then start to spoil.  Hand picked beans (which is what you have) are picked by human hands.  No scrape marks, no broken beans, no spoiling.  It's much more expensive as humans are more costly than machines, but the end product is just so much more wonderful. Sugar Snap Peas- Organic-Sugar snap peas are a cross between an English shelling pea and a snow pea!  So you get tasty peas inside AND a tasty shell!  Store them in a covered container in your fridge for 7-10 days.  But really, considering you can eat them raw or cooked, dipped in hummus to tossed in for a fast fry, you'll eat them within the first few days. Carrots, Bunched, Spray Free- Everyone always wants us to chop the tops off of the carrots that they buy in the store, but we have already packed your bags for you, so you don't get that option.  Take this opportunity to wash, then blend up some of your carrot tops with water.  Freeze the slurry in ice cube trays, and use this in soups in the winter.  Carrot tops taste of strong fresh parsley.  Store your carrots in plastic in your fridge for up to 14 days. Potatoes- Organic-At this time of year potatoes are considered 'new'.  A new potato can be large or small.  Size doesn't matter.  What you're looking for is a skin that peels off  with firm thumb pressure.  They have a high water, low starch content which makes them creamy and sweet and delicious.  You have to store them in your fridge or they will turn brown very quickly.  Wash them up, boil them, and top with dill and butter and a squish of lime.  Store new potatoes in plastic in your fridge for up to 2 weeks.  In the fall, potatoes start to build up starches in an attempt to survive the winter.  This gives fall or winter potatoes their more grainy texture. Gold Beets- Spray free- Golden beets taste like a cross between a carrot and a beet.  They are not actually a cross between a carrot and a beet, they are just a different kind of beet.  Less earthy, more sweet.  It's a great eat raw, sliced thinly on salads, boil then peel, slice and fry in butter, or bake until tender.  You can also turn Beets into chips!! Slice thinly, toss with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and bake at 300 until crisp!  Store in your fridge in plastic for up to 3 months

Half Shares to contain a minimum of 6 of the following items

Summer Savory- Organic- This is the herb that best compliments peas and beans.  Just wash, finely chop, and sprinkle on top of cooked peas and beans.  3 sisters soup (made of corn, beans and squash) is best seasoned with summer savory.  Store in plastic in your crisper for up to a week.  If you don't use it within a week, hang upside down (not in plastic), in a well ventilated area and allow to dry.  Savory is fabulous dry Baby Dill- Spray free- As you have potatoes in your share baby dill is a must.  Wash and boil your potatoes until tender.  Drain the water, add a knob of butter to the pot, the juice of half a lemon, and half a bunch of dill finely shopped.    Store in a plastic bag in your fridge for up to a week.  To preserve for winter use, rinse dill , remove elastic band and place whole bunch in a blender.  Add enough water (about 1/3 cup) so that when you blend the dill it makes a slurry.   Freeze this slurry in ice cube trays.  Once frozen, pop out, put in a freezer safe container and keep in the freezer for future use. Raspberries- Spray free-  Store unwashed, uncovered, in your fridge, for no more than 2-3 days.  It's raspberry season and today's recipe card calls for a raspberry dressing.  Though I can polish off a pint of raspberries just on my own, the local berries make the most beautiful dressings and desserts.  Local raspberries are grown for their flavour, not their shelf life.  They are soft, and smushy looking, they leak through the pint and attract fruit flied if left on your counter for more than a second.  But boy are they delicious.  When you taste local raspberries beside the imports, it makes you wonder why we even bother bringing produce in from California.  If you can't eat these babies right away, please remove them from the pint, pop them in a freezer safe container (removing any leaves or debris that you see), and pop in the freezer for a winter treat. Beans-Spray Free-The local beans that we have at the store are all hand picked.  This means that if you pop them in a plastic bag in your fridge they'll last 7-14 days.  No joke.  Imported and inexpensive local beans are mechanically harvested.  The metal fingers of the harvester scrape the bean, then the beans go through a wash to remove any debris.  This process means that within 48 hours of harvest, the beans start to oxidize where the metal fingers scratched the bean, leaving brown rust lines which then start to spoil.  Hand picked beans (which is what you have) are picked by human hands.  No scrape marks, no broken beans, no spoiling.  It's much more expensive as humans are more costly than machines, but the end product is just so much more wonderful. Sugar Snap Peas- Organic-Sugar snap peas are a cross between an English shelling pea and a snow pea!  So you get tasty peas inside AND a tasty shell!  Store them in a covered container in your fridge for 7-10 days.  But really, considering you can eat them raw or cooked, dipped in hummus to tossed in for a fast fry, you'll eat them within the first few days. Carrots, Bunched, Spray Free- Everyone always wants us to chop the tops off of the carrots that they buy in the store, but we have already packed your bags for you, so you don't get that option.  Take this opportunity to wash, then blend up some of your carrot tops with water.  Freeze the slurry in ice cube trays, and use this in soups in the winter.  Carrot tops taste of strong fresh parsley.  Store your carrots in plastic in your fridge for up to 14 days. Potatoes- Organic-At this time of year potatoes are considered 'new'.  A new potato can be large or small.  Size doesn't matter.  What you're looking for is a skin that peels off  with firm thumb pressure.  They have a high water, low starch content which makes them creamy and sweet and delicious.  You have to store them in your fridge or they will turn brown very quickly.  Wash them up, boil them, and top with dill and butter and a squish of lime.  Store new potatoes in plastic in your fridge for up to 2 weeks.  In the fall, potatoes start to build up starches in an attempt to survive the winter.  This gives fall or winter potatoes their more grainy texture. Gold Beets- Spray free- Golden beets taste like a cross between a carrot and a beet.  They are not actually a cross between a carrot and a beet, they are just a different kind of beet.  Less earthy, more sweet.  It's a great eat raw, sliced thinly on salads, boil then peel, slice and fry in butter, or bake until tender.  You can also turn Beets into chips!! Slice thinly, toss with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and bake at 300 until crisp!  Store in your fridge in plastic for up to 3 months