Featured Article

Freezing Asparagus for the Winter!

May 09, 2019
You can pickle or can asparagus for the winter, but I am much much too lazy for such things.  I'll freeze asparagus as it takes next to no effort. It's...

Sue's Fiddlehead or Asparagus Pasta

May 09, 2019
You have to love our customers.  They love food and cooking as much as I do, and they SHARE their recipes!! Here is Sue's fiddlehead pasta Sue’s Fiddlehead Pasta 2...

Asparagus Chevre Toast...an easy party pleaser

May 09, 2019
Grill your local asparagus as per my "Asparagus on the BBQ" recipe. Take one sliced ciabatta loaf from our bakery. Brush one side of the ciabatta with grape seed oil. ...

Asparagus on the BBQ

May 09, 2019
The only way I will eat asparagus is on the BBQ.  We make this dish at least 3 times a week during asparagus season. Heat your grill to high, then...

Erin's pasta sauce with frozen tomatoes.

May 09, 2019
This is how I make up my pasta in the winter.  Its fresh taste brings a blast of summer memories back. An hour or two before supper get 6 tomatoes...

CSA pick up January 26th

Hello all! I wrote a wonderful email for you last week.  Then completely forgot to send it.  It was -6 degrees and we were skating on the forks trail with friends.  When the weather is balmy, I love to be either skating or cross country skiing.   And with this winter's lack of snow, it's been hard to find a well set ski trail.  This lack of snow could also effect the strawberry crop next year.  Strawberry plants are perennials.  Farmers plant them in year one, and harvest from the same plants in years two, three and four.  To help the strawberry plants survive, farmers pile straw on the berry plants in the fall, and hope for a good insulating layer of snow.  The snow acts like a blanket, protecting the plants from frost damage, also known as winter kill.  In years of little snow and cold weather, plants get damaged and the next year's crop is not plentiful.  So for the sake of the strawberries (and the ski trails), I'm crossing my fingers for a blanket of snow before the next cold snap! This week all shares to receive.... Lettuce, spray free Frozen chopped onions, spray free.  You can use these from frozen, or thaw them out and cook with them from thawed. I used some of these in soup the other day. To loosen up the onions, I double bagged the onions, then whacked them on the side of the stairs in our house.  Ta Da!  Free flowing ready chopped onions.  Those went into the bottom of the pot with some black beans, garlic, 4-5  of frozen tomatoes then topped with some chicken legs that I seasoned up.  I roasted it all for about 90 minutes.  Once the chicken was all gone, I used the left over sauce as a base to make spaghetti sauce. Apple leather, spray free.  The only ingredients in this is apples and strawberries.  Our processor harvests apples, cores them, grinds them up with the strawberries,  then lays them out on trays in a big dehydrator until they're apple leather.  You can eat this just as is, or chop up bits to add to your morning oatmeal, like I just did today. Frozen sour cherries.  One of our fabulous CSA members let me know that her family has been straining the juice off of the cherries and making cherry coke with them!  Pure Genius! Mixed shares to receive the above base as well as Whitefish, sustainably harvested from northern Manitoba.  Chop this up and simmer in tomato sauce, turn into a whitefish stew, batter and fry, turn into tacos, wrap with proscuitto and fry it up, Grass Fed Beef patties.  Yup you can use these for those open faced burgers that I've been obsessing over, or you can make regular hamburgers, OR you can chop up and brown as a base for spaghetti sauce or chilli.  As these burgers are already portioned and seasoned with salt and pepper, they are great for a small household that wants to make a small batch of something.  Sometimes and one pound pack of ground beef is just too much. Eggs, freely ranged and organic.  Hermann Grauer from Nature's Farm raises freely ranged organic laying hens.  He makes beautiful pasta with the eggs, but also sells the eggs to top restaurants and fine food stores in Manitoba.  Not only are his chickens ethically raised, but he feeds them calendula (a kind of marigold) flower that gives the egg yolks a beautiful deep golden colour and just so much flavour. Potatoes with a spring of rosemary, organic.  Use the sprig of rosemary to season up your roasted potatoes, or to make rosemary beet chips! Produce plus shares to receive the above base as well as... More lettuce Eggs, freely ranged and organic.  Hermann Grauer from Nature's Farm raises freely ranged organic laying hens.  He makes beautiful pasta with the eggs, but also sells the eggs to top restaurants and fine food stores in Manitoba.  Not only are his chickens ethically raised, but he feeds them calendula (a kind of marigold) flower that gives the egg yolks a beautiful deep golden colour and just so much flavour Granola, Hermann strikes again.  While he was in the processing plant making pasta, Hermann's wife Sheryl decided that they weren't busy enough and created her beautiful granola. Carrots, organic Beets, organic.  I have a thing called a spiralizer.  Every time I use it, it makes me giggle.  I use it to quickly slice beets into beet chips, but you can also use it to make vegetable pastas.  Check out the video here to see what I mean. Frozen Haskap, spray free.  Great vinaigrette recipe here. Produce only shares to receive the above base as well as.... More lettuce Potatoes with a sprig of rosemary, organic.  Use the sprig of rosemary to season up your roasted potatoes, or to make rosemary beet chips! Carrots, organic Beets, organic.  I have a thing called a spiralizer.  Every time I use it, it makes me giggle.  I use it to quickly slice beets into beet chips, but you can also use it to make vegetable pastas.  Check out the video here to see what I mean. Spaghetti Squash, spray free Frozen haskap, spray free.  I like this recipe for a vinaigrette using haskap.