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Fresh Heritage Pork Bone-in Hams

Fresh Heritage Pork Bone-in Hams

Apr 02, 2021
This is a suggested ham recipe used for this specific kind of ham (fresh heritage pork bone-in hams). Please feel free to modify as you wish or simply use as a...
Crampton's Spinach Dip Uses

Crampton's Spinach Dip Uses

Mar 30, 2021
Our famous spinach dip is so much more than just a spinach dip! There are endless possibilities for its uses if you just BELIEVE... or simply follow our spinach dip...
Spinach Artichoke Bread Pudding

Spinach Artichoke Bread Pudding

Mar 30, 2021
This bread pudding came about when we were thinking of other ways to use our famous spinach dip other than just a dip.  This bread pudding is light, fluffy and delicious!...
Meyer Lemon Lemonade

Meyer Lemon Lemonade

Mar 26, 2021
It will feel like spring with this delicious Meyer lemon lemonade! We made one regular and one with some added raspberry syrup.  The raspberry syrup is made to be mixed...
Easter Leftovers - TURKEY TETRAZZINI

Easter Leftovers - TURKEY TETRAZZINI

Mar 15, 2021
Ingredients: 1/4 cup unsalted butter 1 medium onion finely diced 1 teaspoon minced garlic 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning 3/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1/4 cup all purpose flour...

CSA pick up, August 6

There are some veggies that just scream summer.  Beans, Tomaotes, Cucumbers and Peas in the pod.  None of these things taste like anything much in the winter time, if you can find them at all.  Generally we tend to think of  Cauliflower as a winter veggie.  Something to eat when all of the good stuff is gone.  This is what you might think if you haven't ever eaten Cauliflower from Manitoba, IN SEASON! Right now the Cauliflower is in full season, and delicious.  The taste difference between summer and winter cruciferous vegetables is incredible.  Lightly steamed, oven roasted or made into a soup, any simple preparation will do as the taste is so incredible. On top of being incredibly delicious, cruciferous vegetables are filled with vitamines, fiber and cancer fighting properties.  http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/diet/cruciferous-vegetables The walla walla onions in your share this week are a sweet onion variety.  Sweet onions are not defined by a sweet taste, but rather by a high water content.  A sweet onion is one that has a high water content, and a short shelf life.  They can not be stored like cooking onions, and so have a short season.  That's why you will only find Vidalia onions in the spring time.  These onions have a great fresh sweet crunch and are best eaten raw on salads, sandwiches or hamburgers.  They do not caramelize well as their high water content tends to make them go to mush when you cook with them.  So if you're thinking of beautiful brown sweet fried onions, these aren't the onion for that dish. Don't like raw onions?  These walla walla are great in a soup or a stew or a stir fry. Full share to contain a minimum of 7 of the following items. Remember, most perishable item is listed at the top.  Eat the items at the top of the list first, and the end of the list last. Raspberries (spray free) Sour cherries (spray free) Lettuce (organic) Broccoli (organic) Cauliflower (organic) Beans (spray free) Parsley (organic) Walla Walla sweet onions (spray free) Remember, most perishable item is listed at the top.  Eat the items at the top of the list first, and the end of the list last. Half Share to contain a minimum of 6 of the following items Raspberries (spray free) Sour cherries (spray free) Lettuce (organic) Cauliflower (organic) Beans (spray free) Parsley (organic) Walla Walla sweet onions (spray free)