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Freezing Asparagus for the Winter!

May 09, 2019
You can pickle or can asparagus for the winter, but I am much much too lazy for such things.  I'll freeze asparagus as it takes next to no effort. It's...

Sue's Fiddlehead or Asparagus Pasta

May 09, 2019
You have to love our customers.  They love food and cooking as much as I do, and they SHARE their recipes!! Here is Sue's fiddlehead pasta Sue’s Fiddlehead Pasta 2...

Asparagus Chevre Toast...an easy party pleaser

May 09, 2019
Grill your local asparagus as per my "Asparagus on the BBQ" recipe. Take one sliced ciabatta loaf from our bakery. Brush one side of the ciabatta with grape seed oil. ...

Asparagus on the BBQ

May 09, 2019
The only way I will eat asparagus is on the BBQ.  We make this dish at least 3 times a week during asparagus season. Heat your grill to high, then...

Erin's pasta sauce with frozen tomatoes.

May 09, 2019
This is how I make up my pasta in the winter.  Its fresh taste brings a blast of summer memories back. An hour or two before supper get 6 tomatoes...

August 28 Produce CSA pick up

It's such a shame, we've had to disallow comments on the blog due to too much spam.  I love getting comments and questions from customers but the spam management was just becoming too time consuming.  Boo Hiss. On a lighter note, this week's csa will be a hit.  This hot weather has pushed forward some beautiful crops (as I 'm sure you noticed last week with your watermelon!).  We try really hard with each CSA to ensure that you have things to eat right away, and things that will last in your fridge for a few days.  To that end, you will see a continuation on the carrots, beets and potatoes, as well as fresh fruit and more perishable veggies like tomatoes and CORN!!! Yes folks, we have booked ORGANIC CORN for this week's CSA.  Despite a poor germination rate (due to incorrect seed planting depth,) our newest organic farmer has enough organic corn for us to put them in the CSA twice.  Once will be this week, and once will be in a few weeks from now. Feed corn along with soybeans are among the most Genetically Modified crops.  As the genetic "advances" for feed corn continue, these technologies have been brought over to the sweet corn side with many GMO varieties on offer.  Due to customer concerns (thank you customers for pushing us to find out more information!!), we have begun checking the conventional corn varieties that we sell for GMO.  We have been happy to find that our suppliers grow a wide variety of non GMO corn. What is Genetic Modification? It is the use of biotechnology to manipulate the genes of a plant or animal.  The manipulation can include turning genes in an organism on or off to make the organism function more optimally, and can include the insertion of genes from other plants, animals or bacterium.  For example, a fish protein gene may replace a corn protein gene to make the corn more protein rich.  This technology has been around for about 15 years, so really, we are the petri dish in the lab.  If GMOs are harmful to human health, we will only find out in the years to come.  GMO production has lead to less biodiversity in agriculture, more farmer reliance on chemical inputs (especially in the case of roundup ready seeds), and has increased the cost of putting in a crop as these GM seeds are owned by the companies who develop and sell them.  Farmers worldwide are no longer allowed to save their own seeds for the next year's crop.  These seeds and their technology belong to the companies who created them. So why is everything genetically modified these days?  Proponents of GM suggest that to feed this hungry world, we need GM to increase crop yields, decrease disease and increase nutrient value.  One of my favourite Ag. reporters has a different idea about that.  Please read Laura Rance's short article on the yield differences between GM filled Agriculture in North America, Versus Europe, where GM organisms are not permitted.  It's an interesting insight that I wish more farmers would read.  www.winnipegfreepress.com/business/the-growing-truth-about-gm-crops-213627251.html To increase our food security, we need a genetically diverse system that relies on excellent management practices, farmers developing breeds that are suitable for their specific areas and climates, and we need more consumers like you who have made a commitment to purchasing food that is not the cheapest, but is the best.  If you have read that whole rant, thank you!   Tell us that you read the whole rant and we'll pop a little something extra in your CSA bag at the till. Here is what is in your CSA this week! Full Share to contain a minimum of 8 of the following items Corn, Organic Early Gold Pears, spray free, raised to organic standards but not organic.  When they turn slightly yellow, eat immediately as they will spoil quickly thereafter. Apples!!, spray free, raised to organic standards but not organic.  variety to be determined at delivery.  Either Breaky or Goodland. Tomatoes, Organic Parsley, Organic carrots, organic red cabbage, organic gold beets, organic cucumbers, organic Half Share to contain at least 6 of the following items Corn, Organic Early Gold Pears, spray free, raised to organic standards but not organic.  When they turn slightly yellow, eat immediately as they will spoil quickly thereafter. Parsley, Organic carrots, organic red cabbage, organic gold beets, organic cucumbers, organic And of course the ladies of banville and jones have their most welcome recommendations. Start this meal with the beautiful coleslaw and salad, and bring along an interesting white to pair with this course:  the Luna Vineyards "Lunatic" white blend from California ($22.99)--a mischievous blend of varieties to pair with the lovely blends in the salads.  If you prefer something a bit fresher and lighter, try the salad with the Colle dei Venti Cortese ($16.99) from Piedmont, Italy.  Its delicate aromatics light body and clean finish, it will also pair well with a lovely salad starter!